Free Geographic Information Systems: Hacking Google Maps and More

Ilana Barnes

I am teaching a class about *free* GIS software that any library can use. This talk will center around free online systems with some open source GIS systems as well. We will cover ways to use Google Maps, Google Earth, KML, geocoding and some cool fun map sites.

Presenter bio: Ilana Barnes is in her last semester at the University of Michigan. She currently works as a Reference Assistant at the Kresge Business Library and the Clark Library for Maps, Government Information and Data Services. She is also President of the SI Student Chapter of ALA, so you better be nice to her. : )

Good Help is Hard to Find: Choosing a Help Authoring Tool

Elaine Meyer

You are the lucky one – you’ve been chosen by your management to figure out how to provide some sort of help system for the new software product currently in development. How do you get started? What should you look for? How do you choose?

This talk reflects on my experience implementing the Help system for the new ProQuest platform. Not only will you learn more than you ever wanted to know about a software Help system, you will get a sense about how to choose a content management system in general.

Presenter bio:Elaine Meyer is a User Experience Specialist for ProQuest. Elaine spends most of her time at PQ working on the Help system – writing, editing and implementing content into the Help content management system. When not being “helpful”, Elaine does a bit of design work implementing new functionality into the ProQuest platform.  Elaine graduated from the School of Information in 2009, with concentrations in LIS and HCI.

Have no fear, the Academic CV is here!

JJ Pionke

Going into or staying in academia?  Not sure what a CV is?  Want some tips about what it is and what goes on it?  Come to this open presentation/discussion!

Presenter bio: JJ Pionke is an adjunct professor of English, Literature, and Humanities at two community colleges in the Chicago area.  She is also currently a student at the University of Michigan in the School of Information.

Preservation Expertise: An Exploration of Preservation Education

JJ Pionke

What is are the skill sets that are needed to be a professional in the field of preservation?  This presentation will explore the idea of expertise as it relates to preservation and how it also relates to education and skill sets.

Presenter bio: JJ Pionke is an adjunct professor of English, Literature, and Humanities at two community colleges in the Chicago area.  She is also currently a student at the University of Michigan in the School of Information.

What the h*$%?! are 21st century skills?

Andrea Neuhoff

Many of the current efforts to reform education and rethink learning through technology in the United States point to the need to design and construct these new systems of learning around the skills students will need for the twenty-first century. Yet, the term  “21st century skills,” and variants thereof, is rarely defined and often means different things for different thinkers.  This presentation will examine the main areas of overlap and place and roles of libraries and librarians in them. If time allows we will brainstorm ways to incorporate these skills into libraries and library instruction.

Presenter bio: Andrea Neuhoff is a master’s student in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. She is interested in exploring the roles technology, information, and cyberinfrastructure play in higher education and the ways technology will change how students learn in the future. Contact: neuhoffa at umich dot edu.

Game Over: Disaster Planning for the Computer and Video Game Archive

Rebecca Frank

Disaster planning remains one of the most important components of a preservation program in academic libraries, but can be particularly difficult for libraries with unique or unusual items.  This presentation will discuss the process of creating and implementing a disaster plan for the Computer and Video Game Archive at the University of Michigan’s Art, Architecture and Engineering Library beginning with the initial preservation assessment and ending with implementation of the final plan.

Presenter bio:  Rebecca Frank is a second year MSI candidate at the University of Michigan’s School of Information, specializing in Preservation of Information.  She is also a University Library Associate at the University of Michigan’s Art, Architecture and Engineering Library.  She is interested in digital preservation, with a focus on disaster planning.

Evaluating the Success of Digital Preservation Projects in Libraries

Panel of Rebecca Frank, Anne Cox, Graham Hukill, Jesse Johnston, and Adriana Maynard

The panel will discuss the process of evaluating the success of grant-funded digital preservation projects in libraries.  Panelists will begin with a discussion of their own experiences evaluating grant-funded digital preservation projects during Winter 2011, which will be followed Q&A with the audience.

Presenter bios:

Rebecca Frank: Rebecca is a second year MSI candidate at the University of Michigan’s School of Information, specializing in Preservation of Information.  She is also a University Library Associate at the University of Michigan’s Art, Architecture and Engineering Library.  She is interested in digital preservation, with a focus on disaster planning.

Anne Cox: A second year MSI candidate, Anne is specializing in Archives & Records Management and Preservation of Information. She is currently a Collections Assistant at the Visual Resources Collections (UM History of Art) and a Digital Preservation Assistant at ICPSR.

Graham Hukill: Graham is a second year MSI candidate at the University of Michigan’s School of Information, specializing in both Archives and Records Management and Preservation of Information.  He is interested in digital preservation, with a particular focus on metadata creation, management, and dissemination.

Jesse Johnston: Jesse is an MSI candidate at the UM School of Information specializing in archives and information policy. He is also interested in music libraries, ethnomusicology, digital scholarship, and information technology and development (ICTD). He is currently a Foreign Language and Area Studies fellow at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies.

Adriana Maynard: Adriana is a second year MSI candidate at the University of Michigan School of Information, joint specializing in Archives & Records Management and Preservation of Information.  She is interested in historic collections and physical preservation issues and currently works at the University Music Library.

SCVNGR Part 1: Gaming Information Literacy

Meggan Frost and Jill Morningstar

Come learn about using the location-based game SCVNGR for information literacy. A pilot game designed and deployed by graduate students a U-M will be discussed in terms of planning, implementation, learning for students and teachers, and possibilities for the future.

Presenter bios:

Meggan Frost: Meggan is a graduate student in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. She is particularly interested in instructional librarianship, music libraries, and emerging technologies.

Jill Morningstar: Jill is a 2012 candidate for a Masters of Science in Information, specializing in Library and Information Science.

SCVNGR Part II: The Workshop

Meggan Frost and Jill Morningstar

Excited about the possibilities for mobile based learning in libraries and beyond? Come learn about the location-based game SCVNGR and create your own game. Participants will take a short trek, learn how to use the tool, and get started creating their own games. It is suggested but not required that participants bring an iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or Android device.

Presenter bios:

Meggan Frost: Meggan is a graduate student in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. She is particularly interested in instructional librarianship, music libraries, and emerging technologies.

Jill Morningstar: Jill is a 2012 candidate for a Masters of Science in Information, specializing in Library and Information Science.

International Library Projects: A Ghanaian Case Study

Anne Cox

Take a break from the cold and “travel” to Ghana to learn about starting a school library at Ridge Experimental Jr. High School. The planning phase for the project was approximately 10 months, with an in-country implementation phase of 5 weeks. In addition to personal experiences, this presentation will investigate lessons learned about international library development and international projects in general, as well as resources for identifying and participating in such projects.

Presenter bio: A second year MSI candidate, Anne is specializing in Archives & Records Management and Preservation of Information. She is currently a Collections Assistant at the Visual Resources Collections (UM History of Art) and a Digital Preservation Assistant at ICPSR.

Comics, Romance and Hip Hop: Creating unique and relevant collections for your Special Library

Kristin LaLonde

Interested in the future of special libraries? Particularly museum and research libraries? I argue that the future lies in the development of unique collections that combine outreach, awareness and a willingness to get down and dirty. Come with me as I talk about how I do development for my special collections at the Arab American National Museum; Sheikh Romances, Arab American Hip Hop,  Arab American Graphic Novels, Community Cookbooks and the LGBT Arab American collection.

Presenter bio: Kristin LaLonde is the Librarian at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, MI. She is the Chair-Elect for the Museums, Arts & Humanities Division of SLA and a recent graduate of the Wayne State School of Library & Information Science.

Creating a Lasting Relationship with Patrons

Emily Johnson

Librarianship is, or should be, an inherently service-oriented career, but librarians-in-training are rarely given the tools and skills to be effective (or even proficient) at providing excellent customer service to their patrons. I will be discussing the need to improve our customer relationships and how to make some simple changes in our approach and demeanor to create a lasting relationship with our users.

Presenter Bio: Emily Johnson is a student at the University of Michigan School of Information, where she is specializing in School Library Media and Library and Information Science. Her interests are in improving user services and instructional librarianship, especially in non-traditional library settings. She is the co-author of a forthcoming book for children on designing great research questions.

How to Find Business Reference Resources

Karen Stover

It was a good day at the reference desk until little Sally needed additional help finding the Global Revenue and Total Income of the Barbie Company over the past five years for her school project.  The dreaded business reference questions aren’t as scary as everyone thinks! This workshop will cover definitions of basic business information, and how to find relevant Industry data,  Company Data, Analyst Reports and Annual Reports.

Presenter bio: Karen Stover is a second year MSI candidate at the University of Michigan’s School of Information, with a Tailored specialization that focuses on Library Science and Human-Computer Interaction.  She has a Business Management degree from Wittenberg University in Springfield, OH.  She works as a Reference Assistant at both the Steven Ross School of Business, Kresge Library and the Bentley Historical Library.  She is interested in information literacy, emerging technologies, and instructional librarianship.

Unusual Backgrounds: Broadening the Scope of Library Experience

Panel of Geoff Iverson, Ryan Clement, Naomi Herman-Aplet, and Peter Timmons

Libraries will continue to meet an increasingly diverse set of needs beyond their mission to support learning by providing access to information. This requires future librarians to utilize skills that typically cannot be developed in library school. This panel will discuss how knowledge they have gained in maintenance, teaching, retail, and wilderness settings have enhanced the services they provide in a library.

Presenter bios:

Geoff Iverson: Geoff Is a 2013 candidate for a Masters of Science in Information, specializing in LIS.  He currently works at the Clark Library.

Ryan Clement: Ryan is a 2012 candidate for a tailored Masters of Science in Information. He currently works as a reference assistant for the Hatcher-Shapiro libraries and as a research assistant on the P.A.V.E.L. (Preservation and Access Virtual Education Lab) project.

Naomi Herman-Aplet: Naomi is a 2013 candidate for Masters of Science in Information, specializing in LIS.  She currently works in the Hatcher Graduate Library and the Clements Library.

Peter Timmons: Peter is a 2012 candidate for a Masters of Science in Information, specializing in LIS. He currently serves as a University Library Associate at the Hatcher Graduate Library.

Lessons Learned from the People’s Library at Occupy Wall Street

Claire Barco

Did you know that Occupy Wall Street has a library? They do, and it’s awesome. What’s the magic behind the community engagement and passion surrounding the People’s Library? Public libraries need to take stock and change the way they do outreach. The People’s Library can show them how.

Presenter bio: Claire is a first-year Master’s Candidate at UMSI. Her interests include Health Informatics, ICTD, and information use and access (libraries, ahem) for under-served and underrepresented populations in the US and abroad.

A Library … In Space!

Nick Krabbenhoeft

Astronauts spend an extraordinary amount of time floating around and reading while desperately clutching books with both hands so the pages don’t float away. A quick look at the media used on Skylab, the ISS, and Mars500 gives some ideas about the problems of media collections on spaceships. These include the weight costs of physical media, radiation damage to digital media, and the decreasing ability to update the collection as the spaceship moves away from Earth. The quick sprint finishes with a brief mention of the Deep Space Network and the 100 Year Starship and how these problems compound over time.

Presenter bio: Nick holds degrees in Math and Art History from Indiana University and in Anatolian Cultural Heritage Mangement from Koç (coach) University. He catalogs Islamic Manuscripts while researching the future of digital curation.

What to Do if You Hate Reference

Joanna Price

This presentation will discuss the need for librarians in non-reference positions, examples of non-reference jobs and how to find them. It will briefly examine the idea within library culture that  “reference is dead.” (Eli Neiburger, 2010) Finally, it will close with a thematic discussion of the ways in which the growing information needs of our patrons call on skill sets that look new but at heart share many of the same properties with the traditional reference skill set.

Presenter bio: Joanna Price specializes in LIS, hopes to graduate from UMSI in April, talks like a cup-half-empty person but is secretly a cup-half-full kind of a girl.

Electronic Resource Management Systems: Consider the Following

Katherine Marshall

A look at the features of Innovative’s ERM used in tandem with Innovative Millennium III with a brief exploration of the pros and cons. The final message, however, is really about the lines of communication within libraries and how an ERM can provide a way to improve communication between colleagues, with vendors, and with patrons.

Presenter bio: Katherine Marshall is a graduate of the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Her interests include: acquisitions, electronic resource management, and law libraries.